© ThisIsJulia Photography
© SHM / Dirk Passehl
© SHM / Dirk Passehl
© SHM / Dirk Passehl
© ThisIsJulia Photography
© ThisIsJulia Photography
© ThisIsJulia Photography
© ThisIsJulia Photography
© ThisIsJulia Photography

Traditional Ship Harbour in the Sandtorhafen

At its opening in 1866, the Sandtorhafen harbour was the first artificially created harbour basin in Hamburg in which seagoing ships could be loaded and unloaded lying alongside the docks..

The Sandtorhafen is the traditional Ship Harbour of the Hamburg Maritime foundation and is the link between tradition and modernism in the heart of Hamburg. The curved pontoon of 5.600 square metres and a length of 380 m provides 20-25 berths for historic ship.

In 1866 the Sandtorhafen was the first artificial harbour basin creation in Hamburg. Over the years they developed and applied a new and revolutionised transhipment concept. By using steam-powered cranes, this lifted the goods from the holds of the ships and placed them into the quay sheds, onto railway wagons or horse-drawn vehicles. Since then the Sandtorhafen has become the foundation for the modern harbour of Hamburg. 

Over the years the harbour became too small for the increasingly large ships, therefore it turned into a terminal for smaller ships from the North and Baltic sea. In 1980s, the small harbour became more irrelevant, due to the container transport, until it was shut down. In September 2008 it was reintroduced as the traditional Ship Harbour, which has become a fundamental part of the maritime HafenCity. Furthermore, the pontoon provides berths for historic ships to uphold the history of the place.

However, the foundation Hamburg Maritime does not only operate the traditional Ship Harbour and numerous historic ships, but were the ones to bring old sailing ships, steamships, freighters and tugboats to the location. For example the working steamship ‘Schaarhörn’, the tugboat of a schooner known as ‘No. 5 Elbe’, the sailing ship ‘Catarina’ and the tourist steamer ‘Seute Deern’. However, there are more historic vessels, which can be found in the harbour during big event, such as the gaff-topsail schooner ‘J.R. Tolkien’, the ‘Loth Loriën’ or the former warship ‘Freddy’.

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Rickmer Rickmers
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Museum ships in the port of Hamburg Historic ships

Numerous museum ships scattered throughout the port of Hamburg embody the maritime heritage of the Hanseatic city on the Elbe. Discover the most beautiful historic ships in Hamburg.

Historic ships
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On the go in HafenCity

Although it is by no means complete, HafenCity already offers numerous attractions, restaurants, architectural masterpieces and places to relax.

On the go in HafenCity
© ThisIsJulia Photography

CITY AREA PORTRAIT HafenCity & Speicherstadt

The world’s largest warehouse complex and UNSESCO World Heritage. On the other side, towards the banks of the Elbe, the modern, ever-growing architecture of the new harbour district HafenCity. Also, you can enjoy the view of the harbour from nearly everywhere.

HafenCity & Speicherstadt

THIS MIGHT INTEREST YOU AS WELL Further recommendations

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UNESCO Heritage Site Speicherstadt

An unmissable attraction in Hamburg: The large harbour tour takes you through the canals of Speicherstadt.

Speicherstadt
© mediaserver.hamburg.de / Escape Filmproduktion

Stroll, relax and watch the ships on the Elbe beach Elbe beach

The Elbe beach near Övelgönne is a pretty hot tip in summer. When the temperatures rise and the sun burns, nothing is more refreshing than a jump into the cool water.

Elbe beach
© ThisIsJulia Photography

Explore one of the largest non-nuclear submarines in the world, U-434 U-434 submarine museum

Explore one of the largest non-atomic submarines in the world, U-434. It was once used by the Russian Navy for espionage, now it is moored in Hamburg as a submarine museum.

U-434 submarine museum

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