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Prototyp Car Museum

You can hardly get any closer to the automotive icons of motorsport than at the car museum PROTOTYP in Hamburg's HafenCity. Barriers and separating glass walls are omitted in the presentation of the fascinating and often very rare exhibits, so that visitors can look at the vehicles and take exceptionally beautiful photos from all perspectives. An informative and entertaining pleasure!

This museum is different and therefore a kind of prototype. The aim is to convey passion for beautiful design and powerful engines. Under the motto "People. Power. Cars." not only are around 50 interesting vehicles presented, but an insight is provided into the life of legendary race drivers and constructors. History comes to life. History is told through stories.

With great attention to detail, selected small objects from the everyday life of the pioneers of motor racing (correspondence, trophies, curious key chains) round off the detailed informational texts, leaving facts and anecdotes in the minds of the visitors.

The focus of the permanent exhibition are sports and racing cars from the middle of the last century, including the "Fetzenflieger" by Otto Mathé, the Streamliner racing car by Petermax Mueller and the legendary Berlin-Rome car Porsche Type 64, considered a "forefather" of all the following Porsche sports cars. However, representatives of the new generation are to be admired, such as Michael Schumacher's and Sebastian Vettel's first "official car". If you want to feel, even for a few minutes, like a racing driver, just sit in the Porsche 356 driving simulator and select one of the international circuits of the display.

Over three floors (2,500 m2) there is also a glass workshop, a small cinema, a library, an audio box with individually selectable engine sounds of the most famous sports and racing cars, a wind tunnel to research "streamline knowledge" as well as temporary exhibitions on "automotive fascination". The adjacent museum café "Erlkönig" and the museum shop can make a relaxing "pit stop".

The impressive Rotklinkerbau, built 1902-1906, has been a listed building since 2005 ad since April 2008 and is the location of the Prototyp car museum. The formerly marshy ground on Großen Grasbrook, south-east of the city, demanded a special construction technique: The backbone of the 70-metre-wide building is a skeleton of 14 vertical steel columns and the corresponding number of cast-iron cross-beams, which are mounted in the joints. Under the direction of museum founders Thomas King and Oliver Schmidt, the building has been carefully modernised and with the stylish material repetition of the historic cast-iron elements in the interior and in the design of the entrance area forms a striking specimen in HafenCity.

So a visit to the PROTOTYP car museum is not only a worthwhile destination for technology enthusiasts, but anyone who has pleasure in intelligent implementation of performance and beautiful design.

The car museum fulfils certain quality criteria for people with visual impairments and specific quality criteria for blind people. You can use this reliable information to check suitability in relation to your personal needs.

Information on accessibility has been compiled in the following section.

 

Museum entrance

  • The entrance area is well lit with no glare.
  • The entrance area contrasts in colour to the rest of the surroundings.
  • The entrance area is discernible by a tactile change in flooring.
  • There are no good quality tactile demarcations along the walkway to the museum entrance or visually contrasting and tactile guiding strips available.
  • The entrance to the building can also be reached using the stairs or a ramp.
  • There are no handrails available on the staircase and the steps do not have any visually contrasting edges. There is no distinct visual or tactile contrast between the flooring and stairs.

There are stairs between the floors (alternative: lift)

  • The stairs are well lit with no glare.
  • There are handrails on both sides which continue horizontally for 27 cm at the top and bottom of the stairs.
  • There is no distinct visual or tactile contrast between the flooring and stairs and the steps do not have any visually contrasting edges.

There is a lift to access each floor (alternative: steps)

  • The lift is well lit with no glare.
  • Operating elements are visually different to the rest of the surroundings and tactilely detectable.
  • The floor numbers are tactilely detectable in the door soffit or in door frames.
  • Outgoing emergency calls are confirmed audibly.

Pay point for the museum and shop

  • The point of sale areas are well lit.
  • The till display is clearly identifiable.

Rooms (exhibition, café, shop), and connecting corridors

  • The rooms are illuminated.
  • There are obstacles, e.g. objects jutting out into the area, that may hinder you.
  • It is only possible to use walls as an orientation aid in certain areas (e.g. in the Basement)
  • There are visual and tactile differences in the floor structure in places.
  • There are no good quality tactile orientation aids perceptible underfoot, nor are there other fixtures that can be used for guidance.
  • There are no guiding strips which can be used as floor-based guidance in the building.
  • Connecting corridors are well lit, have no glare and are visually distinguishable. You can use the wall to guide yourself along. There are some obstacles (stand-up displays, coat stands).

Doors/passageways

  • Doors and door frames have no visual difference to the rest of the surroundings.
  • Operating elements are visually different to the rest of the surroundings and tactilely detectable.

Exhibits

  • Exhibits are visually distinct to the rest of the surroundings to a certain extent.
  • Exhibits are generally well lit.
  • Exhibits are displayed in cabinets in the room and in wall cabinets. The cars on display have been arranged in the room itself.
  • Descriptions about the exhibits are located on the ground.
  • The shelves with glass doors are well lit.

Café

  • Assistance dogs (companion or guide dogs) are allowed on the premises.
  • There are tables with bright, glare free lighting.
  • The lettering used for the menu is plain and in high-contrast.

Signage (museum entrance, ticket office, exhibitions, toilet, café)

  • Signs are dislayed in a clear, legible font. There is a distinct visual contrast.

Guided tours

  • As a general rule, guided tours are possible and subject to prior reservation and a fee. Tours for people with disabilities are offered by Museumsdienst Hamburg, where appropriate.

Test report DSFT Berlin (Only German)

Download PDF-test report for blind or visually impaired people

The car museum was awarded the designation “Accessibility verified: accessible for people who have limited mobility (people who may, at times, be dependent on walking aids or non-motorised wheelchairs)” and either fulfils the following criteria in all inspection-related areas, among others, or corresponding alternatives are available and in place:

  • All rooms and facilities can be accessed without the use of stairs or via a maximum of one step.
  • All passageways/doors are at least 90 cm wide.
  • All relevant movement areas are at least 120 cm x 120 cm in size.

In addition, the car museum fulfils certain quality criteria for wheelchair users You can use this reliable information to check suitability in relation to your personal needs.

Information on accessibility has been compiled in the following section.

Museum entrance

  • The walkway to the main entrance of the museum allows pedestrians and vehicles to pass without complication.
  • Access to the building is also possible using stairs or a ramp.
  • There are 2 steps which are 10 cm high and no straight flights. There are no handrails in place.
  • The ramp is 5 m wide and has a minimum width of 120 cm. Longitudinal slopes may be a maximum of 4 %.
  • The door is 132 cm wide and there are no thresholds in the passageway. The movement area to the side of the door where it opens is 300 cm x 220 cm.
  • The walkway in the entrance area inside leads through a 5 m long corridor which is at least 205 cm wide.

There are stairs between the floors (Alternative: lift)

  • Stairs lead up 13+2 steps which are 17 cm high.
  • There are straight flights of stairs.
  • There are handrails on both sides which continue horizontally for 27 cm at the top and bottom of the stairs.

There is a lift between the floors. (Alternative: stairs)

  • The movement area in front of the lift is 400 cm x 300 cm.
  • The lift door is 110 cm wide and the lift car is 165 cm x 210 cm in size.

Pay point for the museum and shop (first floor)

  • The walkway to the pay point and shop leads through a 12 m long corridor which is at least 195 cm wide.
  • The box office counter is 110 cm high. There is no other, comparable way to communicate.
  • The movement area in front of the till area is 170 cm x 800 cm.

Exhibition rooms I – IV (first floor, basement, ground floor)

  • Seating is available.
  • An interactive library with touch screens in seating alcoves is available on the first floor. They cannot be used with a wheelchair.
  • The walkway between lounges 1 and 2 is 4 m long and at least 130 cm wide.
  • In the third passageway to lounge 2, a ramp is used as a threshold. This has a 6 % longitudinal slope, is 1.20 m long and at least 105 cm wide. The movement areas on both sides of the corridor are 200 cm x 250 cm in size.

Exhibits

  • Exhibits/goods can be seen from both a sitting and standing position.
  • Exhibits are displayed in cabinets in the room and in wall cabinets. The cars on display have been arranged in the room itself.
  • Descriptions about the exhibits are located on the ground.
  • Objects in display cabinets in the room have been placed 90 cm and 112 cm high. The display cabinets can be seen and approched from all sides.
  • Exhibits in display cabinets have been placed at heights of between 80 cm and 220 cm high. The shelves with glass doors are well lit.

Public disabled toilet (basement)

  • The toilet door is 96 cm wide, has no threshold and opens outwards.
  • The movement area in front of the toilet and wash basin is at least 138 cm x 138 cm.
  • The movement area to the left of the toilet is 90 cm x 71 cm and 96 cm x 71 cm to the right.
  • Fold-up hand rails are located on either side at a height of 87 cm.
  • The wash basin is 67 cm high and accessible without restrictions by at least 30 cm.
  • The mirror can be used while in both a sitting and standing position.
  • There is an alarm contact (cord).

Café (first floor)

  • The walkway to the café leads through a 8 m long corridor which is at least 150 cm wide.
  • The narrowest passageway in the café is 172 cm wide.
  • There are no tables which have a maximum height of 80 cm, a clearance level underneath of 67 cm and a depth of 30 cm.

Shop (first floor)

  • The narrowest passageway is 80 cm wide..
  • There are no seating areas.

Media/guided tours

  • As a general rule, guided tours are possible and subject to prior reservation and a fee. Tours for people with disabilities are offered by Museumsdienst Hamburg, where appropriate.

Test Report DSFT Berlin (Only German)

Download PDF-test report for wheelchair users or People with limited mobility

The car museum fulfils certain quality criteria for people with hearing impairments and specific quality criteria for deaf people. You can use this reliable information to check suitability in relation to your personal needs.


Information on accessibility has been compiled in the following section.


Ticket office, exhibitions, shop, café

 

  • There is no audio induction loop system.
  • If an alarm sounds, there is no clearly visible flash or flashing signal.

There is a lift to access each floor (alternative: steps)

  • Outgoing emergency calls are not confirmed visually.

Café

  • There are no tables with no standing or hanging lamps that might disrupt your field of vision/eye contact.
  • There are no seating areas with low ambient noise.

Guided tours

  • As a general rule, guided tours are possible and subject to prior reservation and a fee. Tours for people with disabilities are offered by Museumsdienst Hamburg, where appropriate.

Test report DSFT Berlin (Only German)

Download PDF-test report for deaf or hearing impaired people

Contact and advice

Automuseum Prototyp 
Shanghaiallee 7
20457 Hamburg

040 - 3999 6970

www.prototyp-hamburg.de 

Accessibility verified